Wednesday, January 13, 2010

INDEFEASIBLE, I-N-D-E-F-E-A-S-I-B-L-E, INDEFEASIBLE [Our Terms]

indefeasible • \in-dih-FEE-zuh-bul\ • adjective : not capable of being annulled or voided or undone

Example Sentence:
After his father's untimely demise, which reeked of foul play, Prince Nikolai took to the throne as was his indefeasible right as the king's eldest son.

History:
We acquired "indefeasible" in the mid-16th century by combining the English prefix "in-" ("not") with "defeasible," a word borrowed a century earlier from Anglo-French. "Defeasible" itself can be traced to an Old French verb meaning "to undo" or "to destroy." It's no surprise, then, that something indefeasible is essentially "un-undoable" or "indestructible." Another member of this family of words is "feasible," meaning "capable of being done or carried out." Ultimately, all three -- "indefeasible," "defeasible," and "feasible" -- can be traced back to the Latin verb "facere," meaning "to do."



indefeasible
I went to my professor and begged him to change my grade. I mean, I had a good excuse! He politely informed me that my grade had already been submitted and was therefore indefeasible. Bugger.

Your turn! Use indefeasible in a sentence in the comment section!

3 comments:

Kate T said...

In the Princess Bride, Vizzini found many things inconceivable but in the end it was his death that was not only conceivable but indefeasible.

vanessa said...

Sorry, I don't have a good sentence right now, but I just wanted to say that I LOVE this post idea! Thanks for the mini-vocab lesson!

Emily said...

I fully admit, the first thing I thought of when I read this post was "would you stop saying that, I don't think that means what you think it means!" I guess Kate T and I are sharing the brain. This is a good word to know!